Fashion Law – WFMFR recommends:

1. Biyan (2015) by Biyan Wanaatmadja and Natasha Fraser-Cavassoni and Stefan Khoo Photos, edited by Marc Ascoli. Rizzoli New York:  "Drawing inspiration from Indonesia’s rich heritage, fashion designer Biyan Wanaatmadja’s first book is a master class in ethereal elegance. Indonesia’s most celebrated fashion designer, Biyan Wanaatmadja, learned his craft in Germany at M. Müller & Sohn and in England at the London College of Fashion before returning to Indonesia to launch his acclaimed label BIYAN. Combining classic and sophisticated tailoring with a profound appreciation for the handcrafting traditions of his home country such as batik, weaving, and embroidery, Biyan creates a feminine, fairy-tale–like look that is at once romantic, captivating, and modern. Refined and enchanting, this book serves as a gorgeous introduction to the singular oeuvre of the lauded designer and will be a must-have for fashion lovers."

 

Biyan (2015): Photos by Stefan Khoo

2. Culture to Catwalk. How World Cultures Influence Fashion. (2011) by Kristin Knox. Bloomsbury Publishing:  "A contemporary look at both traditional clothing and street styles from 38 countries around the world and the influence these two very different kinds of dress are having on fashion and designers today.  Traditional dress from around the globe inspired the early designs of people like Coco Chanel and Christian Dior. Culture to Catwalk looks back at the roots of the industry, the backlash against brash consumerism, globalisation and 'fast-fashion' and that what people are wearing locally on the streets is once again influencing what stalks the catwalk (just as at the turn of the century)."

3. Who Owns Culture? Appropriation and Authenticity in American Law (2005) by Susan Scafidi. Rutgers University Press: "Susan Scafidi takes the reader on a tour of the no-man's-land between law and culture, pausing to ask: What prompts us to offer legal protection to works of literature, but not folklore? What does it mean for a creation to belong to a community, especially a diffuse or fractured one? Can we strike a balance between affiliative ownership and a creative commons? And is our national culture the product of Yankee ingenuity or cultural kleptomania? Providing new insights to communal authorship, cultural appropriation, intellectual property law, and the formation of American culture, this innovative and accessible guide greatly enriches future legal understanding of cultural production."